Rochelle Goldberg, "The Hero Isn't Special"

Rochelle Goldberg, "The Hero Isn't Special"

Rochelle Goldberg

(b. 1984, Vancouver, Canada, lives and works in New York)
 
“Skin,” 2012
Latex, adhesive medium, chrome foil, velcro
“The Hero Isn’t Special,” 2011
Plexi, chrome foil, surveillance mirror, salvaged wood, hydracal, silicone, paper
“The Plastic Impossible,” 2011
Latex, chrome foil, surveillance mirror, wood foam, hydracal, silicone, paper
Deleuze & Co.
 
While Rochelle Goldberg’s work may derive inspiration from philosophical or art historical referents, its driving force lies in its physicality and workmanship. “Skin,” for example, alludes to Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto, but its phenomenological impact is mediated not by any evident name dropping or overt citation, but the overwhelming energy residual from its experimental, joyful fabrication. Goldberg’s is a practice dedicated to the studio, producing works to an intimate human scale which address issues of identity and femininity through visual and constructive tropes. The artist frequently employs materials imbued with symbolism–the feminine curves and formal ruptures in “The plastic impossible” appear strapped down with bondage-like tape tinseled with futuristic chrome foil–but allows her work a playfulness that comes from both near-obsessive physical engagement and studied reflection.

Goldberg graduated from McGill University with a degree in Art History and Cultural Studies in 2006 and later studied sculpture at The New York Studio School, graduating in 2010. Recent exhibitions include III with Elaine Cameron-Weir and Robin Cameron at Martos Gallery, New York; and Better Left Unsaid at Clearing, Brooklyn, New York.